The Super Bowl is easily the single biggest event of the year for any sports fan. From the build-up from the media, to the theatrics of the halftime shows, to the exorbitantly expensive 30-second commercial ad spots, to the game itself determining the champion of the most popular American sport, there’s so much to look forward to. We at TickPick – the only no fee marketplace for sports, concert, and theater tickets – have created a list of five fun facts about the Super Bowl for fans who are geared up for this year’s contest in Miami at Hard Rock Stadium on February 2nd.

5 Fun Super Bowl Facts to Know

Who’s the Most Successful Quarterback in Super Bowl History?

If you were to ask any NFL fan this question prior to 2001, they would have laughed in your face if you ever disputed that the 49ers‘ Joe Montana would be unseated as the greatest Super Bowl quarterback of all time. Then Mo Lewis went and demolished Patriots starting QB Drew Bledsoe, and Tom Brady’s New England Patriots career was born. Over the next 18 years, Tom Brady has established himself as the gold standard for clutch quarterback play, and there’s no greater evidence of that than his performances across eight (and counting) Super Bowls, with six victories and four game MVP awards.

The First Super Bowl Was Played Back in 1967

While the inaugural Super Bowl was played in 1967 between the NFL champion Packers and and AFL champion Chiefs, there was a storied history of NFL and AFL championships played by original franchises in the years preceding the big game between the champions of each league. Since the merger, the New England Patriots and Pittsburgh Steelers have won the most Super Bowl titles, with 6 a piece.

The Cost of Airing a Commercial During the Super Bowl is Astronomical

What’s it worth to brands to gain exposure to the world in front of the most highly-watched event of the year? Well, recent studies and reports suggest that major companies spend up to $5 million to run a single 30-second ad during the game.

This has obviously encouraged brands over the years to up their game and ensure that the ads they run create a lasting impression for viewers, as they compete to be the one that everybody is talking about at work the next day. These network execs know the value of the incredible viewership levels, so charging top dollar will continue until major corporations like Pepsi and Budweiser decide to stop paying them. Spoiler alert: they will not.

The Super Bowl Was Originally Called Something Else

Though it may seem crazy to fans now that the game has firmly established itself as the single biggest even in sports and one that’s viewed in roughly 100 million homes annually, the Super Bowl wasn’t even the official name of the game until the fourth one was played in 1970.

The game was originally referred to as the much more generic ‘Final Game,” “Championship Game,” or even “First AFL-NFL World Championship Game” before Kansas City Chiefs owner Lamar Hunt half-jokingly suggested “Super Bowl,” as inspired by the Super Ball, a bouncy ball made for children that his own children had taken a liking to. The rest of the league execs approved, and the rest is history.

One can only imagine that if the glitzy “Super Bowl” moniker didn’t catch on, perhaps the event itself doesn’t gain the sort of early traction that helped to propel the game into the American, then global consciousness.

Half of NFL Teams Have Yet to Win a Super Bowl

Surprisingly, there are still 16 of the NFL’s 32 franchises who have yet to win a single Super Bowl title. Those teams are the Bengals, Bills, Cardinals, Chargers, Falcons, Panthers, Titans, and Vikings, with others like the Browns, Jaguars, Lions, and Texans never even reaching the big game. The Bills and Vikings have had the worst luck, each losing four Super Bowls, with the Bills losing an astounding four in a row from 1991-1994. Some of those teams are still alive and vying to win their first Super Bowl here in 2020 in Miami.

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